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Saturday Summary – This week’s #Eurovision news recap

Saturday Summary – This week’s #Eurovision news recap

Another month has passed, but that doesn’t mean that the news ever stops!!!. With our weekly #SaturdaySummary you won’t miss anything in the Eurovision world! Let’s get started. On the following pages, you will find the news of the week. Amsterdam withdraws from Eurovision 2020 Hosting Race Despite being one of the favourites to host the contest next year, it has been announced that Amsterdam has withdrawn from the race to host next year’s contest. Amsterdam next city to withdraw from 2020 Eurovision hosting race
Eurovision 2020: Meet the bidding Host Cities

Eurovision 2020: Meet the bidding Host Cities

Only five cities remain hopeful of hosting Eurovision 2020. Each of those five has its own specific pros, cons and unique selling points. In this piece, we’ll provide you with fact sheets for each of the remaining bids. Time to take a look! Rotterdam: The obvious choice Venue: Ahoy RotterdamCapacity: 16,426Population: 635,389 (2017)Support from: South Holland province, cities of The Hague and Dordrecht Now Amsterdam has withdrawn from the race, Rotterdam seems to be the obvious frontrunner. It’s the biggest city left and the only one in either of the Holland provinces. Tourism agencies have been promoting the city for tourists for a while now and Eurovision 2020 might just be the biggest opportunity for the city to conquer a spot on the list of tourist destinations. Now, Rotterdam is different from other cities in the Netherlands. There’s not much there from earlier ages as the city was nearly completely destroyed during World War II. The city was rebuilt in modern fashion, with skyscrapers. The Great, or St. Lawrence Church, is the only surviving element from the medieval city. Some do however label the city as slightly boring. There’s plenty to do in Rotterdam. Shopping is a great option with …
Throwback Thursday: Whip out your fan, turn the lights on and Dança Comigo!

Throwback Thursday: Whip out your fan, turn the lights on and Dança Comigo!

This week we will be traveling to the “dark ages” of last year’s host country, Portugal at the Eurovision Song Contest. Get the margaritas ready, whip out and flick your fans and Dança Comigo. Portugal has just recently managed to score their first ever Eurovision win yet they were not always the hot tip for taking the infamous trophy back home. Exactly ten years before their win, Sabrina suggestively invited us on a trip to the moon with the promise of making all our dreams come true, but in the end …. She didn’t. Peeking at the right time Despite not qualifying for the grand final and showcasing her interesting choreography during Saturday’s show, Sabrina did kind of surpass everyone’s expectations. Her decent vocal performance, effortless dance moves (yes, I do think that the ocean wave dance move should make its comeback as showcased in the gif below) and the vibe of enjoying herself on stage truly did push Portugal only a few points away from qualifying, finishing in the unlucky 11th spot in the semi overall. How the slogan “All Aboard” came about Dança Comigo (Vem Ser Feliz) Cheesy yet brilliant! “Dança Comigo” is certainly not the best representation …
XTRA Debate: Should the free language rule be amended?

XTRA Debate: Should the free language rule be amended?

One of the best by-products of the Eurovision Song Contest is the celebration of culture. Costume, movement and visual allusions all weave a rich tapestry of a national/transnational identity. Given the nature of the contest, language is the most obvious and intriguing component of identify and diversity. However, as we all know, the majority of Eurovision songs in the modern contest tend to be solely in English. In Junior, songs are required to be in the national tongue, with up to 40% of the song in English. Should the adult contest adopt a similar type of guideline? Eurovision and language The rules surrounding language , much like the role of the juries will forever be a moot point of discussion in the fandom. On one hand, the contest should be seen to encourage cultural diversity, so a rule enforcing that would be the easiest means to achieve that goal. However, participating countries and most importantly the acts should not be forced into performing something inauthentically. There are arguments about English being a ‘superior’ language which explains the UK and Ireland struggling since the free language rule in 1999. I’m not convinced by that claim. Either way – it seems somewhat …
Saturday Summary – This week’s #Eurovision news recap

Saturday Summary – This week’s #Eurovision news recap

Another week with amazing summer weather has passed and you might do not have the time to catch up on all the Eurovision news, so you are welcome, that we write together the main news of the past seven days. With our weekly #SaturdaySummary you won’t miss anything in the Eurovision world! Let’s get started. On the following pages, you will find the news of the week. SVT reveals team for Melfest 2020 Sweden is already working on its next edition of Melodifestivalen 2020. SVT now revealed the core team who will be responsible for the six shows at the beginning of the new year. A lot of experience will be working on it! SVT reveal core team for Melodifestivalen 2020
Throwback Thursday: Alexander Rybak and his ‘Fairytale’…

Throwback Thursday: Alexander Rybak and his ‘Fairytale’…

This ‘throwback’ will bring us to an amazing fairytale, literally!;) Who does not know which «fairytale» I am talking about or who is Alexander Rybak, I guess it’s time for you to read this ‘throwback’ and to listen to this unforgettable entry… Just a reminder… Alexander Rybak is a Belarusian-Norwegian singer, composer, brilliant violinist, outstanding pianist and now even an actor. Rybak was born in Minsk (Belarus), but his whole family emigrated to Norway, when he was just 4 years old. Alexander speaks Russian very well, but with a bit of an accent. He was the one, who  represented Norway at the Eurovision Song Contest 2009 in Moscow (Russia) and became the winner of the contest with 387 points, which at that time was the highest result any country has achieved in the history of Eurovision, but under the old voting system. “Fairytale” was the name of the song that Alexander, by the way, wrote and composed by himself.  Why should you remember ‘Fairytale’ ? Or the cutest Eurovision entry ever In my modest opinion it’s one of the most memorable songs of all Eurovision times. I remember watching Eurovision 2009 and having no doubt at all that ‘Fairytale’ will …
XTRA Debate: Should the Grand Final running order be 100% producer-led?

XTRA Debate: Should the Grand Final running order be 100% producer-led?

For most Eurovision fans, the running order is an all-important part of the contest. Understandably so, it is how we consume and digest the Eurovision Song Contest. There will always be rumours, arguments and debates of how much power the running order has to make or break a song… but should there be a radical shake-up? Something to make the contest even less predictable and harder to predict. Should we consider scrapping a ‘first’ and ‘second’ half format in favour of blocks of four? Or perhaps find an alternative arrangement to 100% producer led draws? Luck of the draw? For many years, the running order for the final was determined by sheer luck. Typically, this involves pulling a country and performance slot out of a hat. In 2003 for example, the running order was decided all the way back in November! During the 2004-2007 era, the countries who had already qualified for the final (generally Big 4 + Host + top 10 from the previous year) were picked at random in advance. The missing slots were filled in by the qualifiers during the live broadcast of the semi-final. While the qualifying countries were announced in a random order, the static …
Saturday Summary – This week’s Eurovision news headlines

Saturday Summary – This week’s Eurovision news headlines

KEiiNO release new single ‘Praying’ The 2019 televote winners have released their new single. KEiiNO release new single ‘Praying’
Meet the ESCXTRA team! Part 39 – JULIAN

Meet the ESCXTRA team! Part 39 – JULIAN

As our team continues to grow, it means there are more of us that you can get to know! Therefore, we will continue to bring back our “Meet the ESCXTRA team” feature each time we have someone new for you to meet. What is our personal Eurovision story? Why did we want to be a part of this website? What are our favourite Eurovision songs of all-time? Also, how can you get in touch with us on social media? Read on to find out! JULIAN SCHULZ I’m an 18-year old soon-to-be student from Germany living in Frankfurt. After finishing high-school last year, I traveled and worked in Australia and New Zealand for six months and will soon start studying agricultural sciences in Stuttgart. Besides Eurovision and music in general, I have a huge passion for gaming, traveling, photography and Drag Race! Your first Eurovision memory? The first time I watched Eurovision was in 2010 when Germany won and I fell under the false impression that your own country winning is a common thing. I later learned that it is in fact not common at all and its probably going to take a long time until I can experience a German …
Throwback Thursday: The Dutch and the Sha-La-Lie

Throwback Thursday: The Dutch and the Sha-La-Lie

This week in Throwback Thursday, we are turning to the reigning champions. However, we’re turning away from success and heading into the middle of their dark era, in 2010. Strap in, and let’s see what’s to love about Sieneke’s fun retro pop tune ‘Ik Ben Verliefd’ (Sha-La-Lie). The Netherlands have just been celebrating their first victory in decades. They’ve transformed themselves into one of the most successful and stand-out nations at the contest in just a few years, starting with the appeal of great songs like Birds and Calm After The Storm, and culminating in Arcade this year. But if we look back a little further, to the beginning of this decade, what were the Dutch like? By way of contrast, I’m taking this throwback back to 2010, to Sieneke’s Ik Ben Verliefd. Just how far have the Dutch come? Bizarre and dated choice Sieneke’s entry is more than a little unusual in the recent Dutch lineup. For starters, it’s in Dutch, the only Dutch-language entry in the 21st century to date. For another, in sound and style, it fits somewhat more in the lineup of older Scandinavian entries. That is to say, it sounds quite like that most traditionally …
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